Episode 120: Does Your Partner Support Your Success?

I’m hearing that more and more, that not only is there a reluctance or a discomfort when women are making more than men in a relationship but it’s actually hurting relationships.
— Diane Reichenberger
I think you have to be clearer than most couples are about how are we going to manage two successful careers? What are the terms of engagement, what kind of support do we need from eachother?
— Avivah Wittenberg-Cox
Avivah wittenberg-cox

Avivah wittenberg-cox

This time we're talking about couplehood and careers. My first guest is shocked that her mentees' boyfriends refuse to marry them until they - the men - are the main breadwinner. My second guest isn't surprised at all. In this episode we talk about who supports whom in heterosexual and same-sex couples, and what that support looks like. We discuss how dual-career couples can maintain partnerships where each person gets what they want and need. And we get tips on using team-building techniques to good effect at home.

My guests are Diane Reichenberger and Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, author of Late Love: Mating in Maturity

You can also read a transcript of the show

Further reading/listening: Avivah first appeared on TBE in episode 41, Stop Fixing Women, Start Fixing Companies.

This is a great episode of the new Harvard Business Review podcast Women at Work - it's called Couples That Work. Avivah is in this one too, along with other guests. 

Here's the 2015 Work and Families Institute study Modern Families - same and different-sex couples negotiating at home.

Do Millennial Men Want Stay-at-Home Wives? via the New York Times, by Stephanie Coontz.

Fairygodboss recently did a survey on male/female couples' attitudes to money in relationships. 

Diane reichenberger (r) and her wife sharon on their wedding day with jack the dog

Diane reichenberger (r) and her wife sharon on their wedding day with jack the dog

Episode 119: Women in Medicine are Burning Out

I think we look at other women and we judge ourselves on how they’re doing. So we see this little iceberg of their lives and we say, are we doing as good a job as they are?
— Robine Devine
Photo by LUHUANFENG/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by LUHUANFENG/iStock / Getty Images
You don’t necessarily show that emotion. And so that’s how I carried on most of the time. And most of the time that worked, you know 90 percent of the time that worked, and then every so often terrible things happen and you react to it.
— Heather Anaya

At the end of 2016 I did a show on burnout that got passed around a lot. At around the same time I began hearing  from female doctors saying burnout is a huge issue in their field. Studies show women doctors burn out at higher rates than men. And given so many of us have at least one woman doctor in our lives, that can't be good for any of us. 

Robin Devine

Robin Devine

In this show we talk about why this is happening. We discuss a lack of empathy in a profession that on the surface seems to be all about it; how women judge one another’s success, and how they can help eachother. 

My guests are family doctor Robin Devine and maternal fetal medicine specialist Heather Anaya.

You can also read a transcript of the show.

Heather anaya with her husband and children

Heather anaya with her husband and children

Episode 118: A Year for Women?

I think changes will be tectonic. We’ve had another movement of a tectonic plate and things are going to settle out and we’ll say, OK, where are we here?
— Anne Libby
I think what might happen is two to three years of hard conversations and unpleasant dynamics. But you need to get that out of the way.
— Nastaran Tavakoli-Far
Nastaran Tavakoli-Far 

Nastaran Tavakoli-Far 

Anne Libby

Anne Libby

Will 2018 be a good year for women at work? After the explosive, high-profile revelations of workplace harassment that snowballed towards the end of 2017, a lot of us are excited about this year. We're hopeful that the momentum created by the #MeToo movement can lead to fairer workplaces with less harassment and more equal pay.  But are we naive?

My guests are US-based Anne Libby, consultant and coach on all things management, and Nastaran Tavakoli-Far, or Nas, who lives and works in London and hosts The Gender Knot podcast. Each talks about her hopes and fears for the year ahead. 

You can also read a transcript of the show

Further reading/listening:

You can sign up for Anne Libby's monthly newsletter On Management here.

You can check out The Gender Knot on iTunes and on the show's website.

This is the letter former BBC China editor Carrie Gracie wrote to the BBC audience, explaining her decision to leave her post in China and return to the UK. She found she was vastly underpaid compared to two male foreign editors, and that the BBC would not consent to pay everyone equally.

Episode 117: Behind the Scenes at The Broad Experience

My desk in Brooklyn while I was working on this episode

My desk in Brooklyn while I was working on this episode

This time, a short show in which I'm the interviewee. Sara Holtz (below) of the Advice to My Younger Me podcast talks with me about how I came to start The Broad Experience, what goes into making it and why production tends to be seat-of-the-pants.

SH web 028.JPG

I also talk about the difficulty of marketing when you're an independent podcaster wearing multiple hats. Below you'll find a picture of my 'studio', otherwise known as my clothes closet, where I record all my parts of the show (except the interviews, when I am sitting at my desk or with the other person). Every time I go in to record I have to move several pairs of boots out of the way, kneel down, and prop my laptop on a shoe shelf to read my script. It's a glamorous life!

It's a squeeze, but it's the only quiet place in the apartment - The clothing acts as a sound buffer

It's a squeeze, but it's the only quiet place in the apartment - The clothing acts as a sound buffer

Episode 116: The Reckoning

Hopefully this idea about shaking up the very foundations of male power, I think it potentially will lead to more women being successful at the top, but in new ways.
— Linda Betts
Photo by Tomwang112/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by Tomwang112/iStock / Getty Images

Women have been resisting over-generalization for a century, so why would we want to turn and generalize men in the same way?
— Laura Linnaeus
Linda betts

Linda betts

Sexual harassment at work used to be something everyone knew about but no one talked about. Now everyone is talking about it. Scores of women are publicly naming prominent men as harassers. Many of those men have lost their jobs. But what does the reckoning mean for women in the workplace, and the power dynamic between the sexes?

This show features two guests, Laura Linnaeus from the US and Linda Betts from Australia. Each has a different idea of what #MeToo and the current climate will do for women's careers.

You can also read a transcript of the show.

Further reading: Here's Amber Tamblyn's New York Times Op-Ed, I'm Not Ready for the Redemption of Men.

The BBC wrote a piece about why there's a flood of sexual harassment allegations in the US, and only a trickle in the UK. 

This piece about what #MeToo has raised for Swedish women is fascinating. Just as my guests pointed out in the show I did called Better in Scandinavia, not everything in the Scandinavian countries is as equal as it seems.

Episode 115: Putting Yourself First

As women we’re particularly resistant to want to give ourselves even a minute’s break. We are servant leaders, we’re so good at taking care of others.
— Leigh Stringer
Self-care has never been part of the narrative for African-American women in this country.
— Theresa Thames
Theresa thames

Theresa thames

For many women, looking after after ourselves in the midst of work and family life can feel like a stretch. In this show we meet two women who ignored what their bodies were telling them before switching tack and putting themselves first. 

A series of crises forced Theresa Thames to take her health seriously. So did discovering the organization GirlTrek

Leigh Stringer

Leigh Stringer

Workplace strategist Leigh Stringer was determined to find a better way to live and work after a particularly grueling project. That led to her writing the book The Healthy Workplace

I made this show because listeners wanted an episode on self-care - but only if it felt real. I hope this fits the bill. 

You can also read a transcript of the show